Search Results

Search results 1-20 of 1,000. There are more results available, please enhance your search parameters.

Logging in with you Steam ID has now been restored ♥

  • Quote from geekofalltrades: “I'm also hearing that Google's solution mitigates the worst of the projected performance impact of the current fixes. Current fixes are projected to make CPUs up to 30% slower for certain workloads. ” The OS kernel VM patches that were recently released are designed to mitigate Meltdown, not Spectre. Google's Retpoline solution is designed to mitigate Spectre, not Meltdown. We need both solutions to be secure from both attacks, which means we'd have the 30% syscall s…

  • A couple of minor updates: - Raspberry Pis are not affected by Spectre, which is great news. This is because the ARM1176, Cortex-A7, and Cortex-A53 CPUs that they use only use their branch predictors for the purposes of fetching and decoding instructions-- they don't use it to perform speculative execution. This means a mispredicted branch can't actually influence the cache, preventing it from leaking sensitive information! The same is likely to be true about many embedded RISC processors, which…

  • Quote from Chickenprotector: “To be fair, it may not require a full redesign of the chip. I'm not familiar with CPU design, but it would be feasible to at least have a safeguard to prevent the Meltdown/Spectre program from operating since the vulnerability has been discovered in the next generation of chips. ” Meltdown should be fixable relatively easily. Since only Intel's chips are affected, it should be feasible for them to redesign the part of their microarchitecture that is affected, to be …

  • They could buy new CPUs to mitigate the slowdown effects of the Meltdown patch, at least. Although even so, as a marketing move this is possibly the worst thing you could do because you've literally destroyed your own reputation and handed over a significant chunk of your business to your closest direct competitor. The costs of redesigning your chip to not have the Meltdown flaw, verifying it, retooling your fabrication, and putting your chips through QC would be insane. Not to mention you'd hav…

  • Quote from Johnwalter: “This whole charade feels like a marketing move. I mean, isn't it a bit conspicuous that there is a hardware issue that allows such a great deal of data leaks on every modern CPU? The chance that this actually is a mistake is so ridiculous, i mean it does not make sense. How could someone in the CPU industry not see such an issue? ” You're right. Spectre is not the result of a mistake. It's an incredibly sneaky and clever exploit of several systems that work together as in…

  • Quote: “Hold tight. AMD is adamant that these exploits do not affect their architecture. ” Ha. If only. If a CPU has both of: 1. A branch predictor, and 2. A cache ... then the CPU is vulnerable to Spectre. Guess what, every modern processor has both a branch predictor and a cache. AMD is definitely vulnerable. Although I find Intel's remarks about the matter to be even more hilarious: Quote: “Intel believes its products are the most secure in the world and that, with the support of its partners…

  • That's a good question. I couldn't find one, myself. You're welcome to try looking for one... maybe your Google-fu will be better than mine. Or maybe if you turn on Windows Update hopefully it'll detect an available update for you?

  • Quote from lambdaman: “i don't want to click on that link, can someone screencap the site or give me the gist of it ” Quote from AsinoEsel: “Quote from dky.tehkingd.u: “Everyone's CPU is vulnerable to this attack. ” You mean everyone's INTEL CPU is vulnerable to this attack...*laughs in Ryzen* Jesus Christ I really hope it's just Intel. Fuck. ” Both Meltdown and Spectre are hardware security bugs in your CPU. They cannot be fixed by software patches. If you use an Intel CPU, you are vulnerable t…

  • spectreattack.com/ Welp, time to panic. Everyone's CPU is vulnerable to this attack. It cannot be patched.

  • It's on hold while we work in the shadows on other mysterious things. (Namely, a bunch of us have personal projects that we're working on at the moment.) That said, I like the concept of this game enough that I definitely want to resume its development in the future.

  • Dr. Dvorak's name was pronounced /dvɔːɹæk/ (DVOR-ack), with no vowel between the /d/ and the /v/. If that's too hard for you, you could always insert a schwa sound or something, like /də.vɔːɹæk/ (roughly de-VOR-ack). The original name is Czech, and is pronounced more along the lines of /dvɔːrʒɑk/ (DVOR-zhaak).

  • Honestly I found it way faster to learn Dvorak than QWERTY. Even if you have nothing but the home row memorized, you can still type out a ton of really common words, unlike QWERTY. From there, it's just a matter of remembering the less common positions, which means the time you spend stalling to remember where, say, the letter 'Z' is, will not impact your speed the vast majority of the time.

  • Just memorize the keys. Who actually looks at the keyboard when they type anyway? Dvorak, at any rate, was invented by a dude named Dr. Dvorak, who was a distant relative of a Czech composer, Antonín Dvořák. Which is probably why it sounds like the name of a fantasy evil lord.

  • It definitely helps with general typing comfort. I know a number of people who switched for that reason, myself included. At some point several years ago I was speed-typing an essay and that got really uncomfortable really quickly. So I made it a point to take the time to learn Dvorak to avoid that in the future. Now I'm fluent in both Dvorak and QWERTY, and while my typing speed is similar for both, I've found that it's far more comfortable to type at speed in Dvorak.

  • Once you actually get the hang of it, it's more comfortable to type at speed. (However, you may not actually notice an increase in speed.) That requires you to actually take a week or two to learn it though. Which is a sticking point for a lot of people.

  • Yeeeeessss EVERYONE JOIN THE DVORAK CLUB. WE HAVE COOKIES.

  • Even if it does break saves, it's easy enough to just restart whichever map you were on.

  • My first "real" game was Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2. I was in kindergarten. My teachers did not take too kindly to the drawings I made each day.

  • OOP in JavaScript is almost completely different from OOP in nearly every other OOP language out there. Have fun! Also, JavaScript in general is just an awful language. And the Web in general is a terrible platform to develop for and the more you work with it, the more you realize that it's just an old piece of 90's tech with a tower of duct tape holding it together, and it was never really designed or meant to handle the kinds of stuff we're making it handle today.

  • Gordon is clearly ninja.png youtube.com/watch?v=rR3bB7qvXqI